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by Alexandra Faulker-Hardy 22nd May, 2019
3 min read

EdTech – A Digital Revolution in the Classroom?

Progress in the education sector consistently heads policy conversation in the UK. Yet, give or take the minor technological transition from chalkboards to smart boards, the classroom has largely remained steeped in conventional methods of learning delivery for the last two hundred years. In a rapidly modernising world, the education sector is struggling to meet demands of the digital landscape. Predictable problems such a mounting workloads, one-size-fits-all learning approaches and ageing textbooks are not aligning to a shifting criterion for digital skills and innovative learning approaches. We ask; as schools around the country seek to improve the future of the learning experience, can EdTech be the answer to the digital revolution so desperately needed to overhaul the education sector?

What is EdTech, and what can it do?

Educational Technology (EdTech) is an important player in expanding the minds and skills of the learning community. The EdTech industry is booming with ground-breaking learning experiences through a variety of services. Playing games for infants, tutoring platforms, coding, early child learning and STEM, through to adult learning in the corporate world, EdTech can reach all corners of the learning experience. It doesn’t stop there. Using big data, artificial intelligence and Customer Relationship Management (CRM) tools, EdTech can mitigate serious challenges facing teachers today. Teachers can utilise technology to virtually transform the profession through creating personal learning networks (PLN), administration and incorporating parental involvement at a click of a button, all wrapped up in a lighter budget.

Government and EdTech

The future for EdTech is big business and a top priority in the future plans for the Department for Education. Damian Hinds, the Sectary of State for Education, announced plans in January 2019 for a £10m government investment, which will be used to create a marketplace for education buyers. Hinds calls for the tech industry to command the revolution as “forging a strong partnership between government, technology innovators and the education sector that there will be sustainable, focused solutions which will ultimately support and inspire the learners of today and tomorrow”. The innovation of the learning environment fundamentally relies on establishing strong relationships between the tech and public sector, navigating new waters in a captivating education technology revolution.

Future Forward Education

Through the EdTech revolution, teachers and the learning community can benefit from the shackles of money and learning restraints. Giving more time and resources for teachers to engage with students through technology retains student achievements through the personalised learning experience, answering questions to the mounting pressure on the education sector. This equates to majorly important resources channelled into real time issues: supporting students, reducing workloads stress and securing the UK’s educational standards in the global rankings. The EdTech industry has the potential to fundamentally and profoundly change how we learn knowledge and how we use it in the classroom and beyond. The tech industry and commercial opportunity is a primary source in directing the new, rapidly growing sector and developing strong ties for finding essential solutions for public sector.

At GK, we can help focus on the process through unique political insight and innovation, collaborating with government with integrity by assisting in driving breakthrough solutions and conversation through national key decision makers. Our team can help you ensure your technological and commercial strategy is aligned with the wealth of innovation currently demanded by the public sector, revolutionising the classroom, the learning sector and your commercial future.

To find out more, check out our blog on the revolution of the tech industry, spanning across the sectors.

See more articles by Alexandra Faulker-Hardy